Quote
"Your assumptions about the lives of others are in direct relation to your naïve pomposity. Many people you believe to be rich are not rich. Many people you think have it easy worked hard for what they got. Many people who seem to be gliding right along have suffered and are suffering. Many people who appear to you to be old and stupidly saddled down with kids and cars and houses were once every bit as hip and pompous as you.

When you meet a man in the doorway of a Mexican restaurant who later kisses you while explaining that this kiss doesn’t ‘mean anything’ because, much as he likes you, he is not interested in having a relationship with you or anyone right now, just laugh and kiss him back. Your daughter will have his sense of humor. Your son will have his eyes.

The useless days will add up to something. The shitty waitressing jobs. The hours writing in your journal. The long meandering walks. The hours reading poetry and story collections and novels and dead people’s diaries and wondering about sex and God and whether you should shave under your arms or not. These things are your becoming.

One Christmas at the very beginning of your twenties when your mother gives you a warm coat that she saved for months to buy, don’t look at her skeptically after she tells you she thought the coat was perfect for you. Don’t hold it up and say it’s longer than you like your coats to be and too puffy and possibly even too warm. Your mother will be dead by spring. That coat will be the last gift she gave you. You will regret the small thing you didn’t say for the rest of your life. Say thank you."

Cheryl Strayed,  Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar 

The useless days will add up to something. […] These things are your becoming.

(via stoweboyd)

Photo
typeverything:

Typeverything.com
Anamorphic 3D Graffiti by Odeith.
via Handmadefont.

typeverything:

Typeverything.com

Anamorphic 3D Graffiti by Odeith.

via Handmadefont.

Photoset

futurescope:

Human Physical Immortality Roadmap

Maria Konovalenko made five nice infographics looking at radical life extension mentioned head/body transplants, cryonics, nanomedicine and AI.

Check out her blog for more.

Photo
mucholderthen:

Goblet and Secretory CellsColored transmission electron micrograph of a section through a goblet cell and secretory cells of the duodenum, part of the small intestine.
Goblet cells (pink & blue) secrete mucus which neutralizes stomach acid.
Mucigen granules (circular objects, at upper center) combine with water to form the mucus.
On either side of the goblet cell are the secretory cells whose secretions help in the digestive process.
The microvilli (green hair- like structures, upper frame) serve to increase the secretory capacity of the secretory cells by increasing their surface area. 
CREDIT: Science Photo

Ooo

mucholderthen:

Goblet and Secretory Cells
Colored transmission electron micrograph of a section through a goblet cell and secretory cells of the duodenum, part of the small intestine.

  • Goblet cells (pink & blue) secrete mucus which neutralizes stomach acid.
  • Mucigen granules (circular objects, at upper center) combine with water to form the mucus.
  • On either side of the goblet cell are the secretory cells whose secretions help in the digestive process.
  • The microvilli (green hair- like structures, upper frame) serve to increase the secretory capacity of the secretory cells by increasing their surface area. 

CREDIT: Science Photo

Ooo

(via buttflower)

Video

futurescope:

Solve for X - Tech Pioneers On Taking Moonshots

I really like the basic idea of the moonshot thinking. The intersection of “a huge problem to solve, a radical solution for solving it and breakthrough technology to make it happen” is a good start for thought-provoking futures and sustainable visions. 

Right now, Technology Moonshots are more science fiction than fact, but will be hopefully soon more fact than science fiction.

From GoogleBlog.co.uk:

Last week, Solve for X gathered 60 entrepreneurs and scientists from around the world to discuss 18 moonshot proposals—world-changing projects that work to address a huge problem, suggest a radical solution and use some form of breakthrough technology to make it work. 

 The proposals:

  1. Erez Livneh - Virus Decoys
  2. Daniel Kerber - Re-engineering Refugee Camps and Slums
  3. Dmitriy Tseliakhovich - Efficient Space Access
  4. Nicholas Chim - Sustainable Architecture at Scale
  5. Julia Greer - 3D Architechted Nano Metamaterials
  6. Ana-Carolina Zeri - Global Science Playground
  7. Ira Glass - Tries to Boss You Into a Moonshot
  8. Karen Gleason - Efficiency from Hydrophobic Surfaces
  9. Aldo Steinfeld - Solar Syngas
  10. Bob Boyd - The Road Not Needed
  11. Suchitra Sebastian - A New Generation of Superconductors
  12. Asel Sartbaeva - Thermally Stable Vaccines
  13. Ido Bachelet - Surgical Nanorobotics
  14. Howard Shapiro - Ending Stunting in Africa
  15. Christopher Wilmer - Efficient Gas Storage and Separation
  16. Yael Hanein - Artificial Solar Retina
  17. Lonnie Johnson - Heat Direct to Electric Energy
  18. Leslie Dewan - Power from Nuclear Waste

[read more]

Yes

(via emergentfutures)

Video

montereybayaquarium:

Did you know that the seafood choices you make can help support healthy oceans? Not all fish are caught or farmed in environmentally responsible ways, but each of us has the power – by the way we choose to spend our money – to shape demand for seafood that’s been caught or farmed sustainably.

This new video from our Seafood Watch program quickly shows you how you can help protect the ocean just by asking your local grocery store or restaurant if they serve sustainable seafood. The oceans will thank you for it!

The Seafood Watch program provides scientifically based recommendations on what seafood options are best for the environment. You can also download the free Seafood Watch app or pick up a consumer pocket guide today.

Learn more about choosing sustainable seafood!

Yea!

Video

frontal-cortex:

This reconstruction, produced by researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany using a technique called digital scanned laser light sheet fluorescence microscopy, shows the movements of all 16,000 cells in an 18-hour-old zebrafish embryo.

To make the film, the researchers injected a fluorescent protein into an embryo at the one cell stage. They began imaging at the 64-cell stage and recorded 370 images, each less than 3 thousandths of a millimeter apart, in multiple directions at 1,226 time points separated by 90 second intervals. The recording was performed at a continuous speed of 10 million voxels (or volume elements) per second, to generate more than 430,000 images totalling 3.5 terabytes of data.

When this enormous data set was used to analyse the three-dimensional pattern of cell division, a symmetry-breaking event was revealed. Before this event, the embryo has no left or right side and is said to be radially symmetrical. When this is broken, the bilaterally symmetrical body plan begins to emerge and the orientation of the future body axes can be accurately predicted.

This movie and 15 others accompany a paper published in Science. All of them can be downloaded at the digital embryo repository website. (scienceblogs.com)

This digitally expresses the primordial stages of spirit as well…

(via molecularlifesciences)

Photo
facts-i-just-made-up:

Stalactite supervisor John Sato examines new formations with disappointment.
"A proper stalactite grows downward," said Sato, "But these younger stalactites are rebellious and have little respect for tradition. We’ve caught them growing sideways, diagonally, I saw one just yesterday that grew down at first but then went straight back up again into the rock ceiling."
Numerous theories abound as to why the stalactites are growing more bold. Some blame global warming for chemical shifts in the dripping minerals. Others feel television is to blame. But Sato has another theory:
"Many stalactites today come from modern rock. Classic rock held superior morals and produced straight stalactites. But modern rock, such as hard rock or acidic rock aren’t so solid. To keep stalactites on course, we must examine both the rocks and the role played by the minerals, the substance they communicate downward. Only with a comprehensive study of rock and role will we come to an understanding of the problem, and begin to move toward a solution. Such as an opaline silica solution, or a 50% fluorite solution."
Others feel that blaming rock is a cop-out, and that the problem lies with society’s standard of binary geological roles. Said Peter Saenz of GLAAD (Geological Land Appraisal And Diagnostics), “Who are we to say a stalactite has to be straight and hook up with a stalagmite? Maybe some stalactites are meant to meet other stalactites, maybe some stalactites want to find their own way through the caves. It’s not for us to dictate.”
This viewpoint has proven controversial, with high ranking clergy at the Vatican stating, “The Bible clearly states that speleothems are between one stalactite and one stalagmite, and that it is the stalactite’s role to descend upon the other.”
Peter Saenz retorts that the Vatican needs to mind its own business about what others go down on.

facts-i-just-made-up:

Stalactite supervisor John Sato examines new formations with disappointment.

"A proper stalactite grows downward," said Sato, "But these younger stalactites are rebellious and have little respect for tradition. We’ve caught them growing sideways, diagonally, I saw one just yesterday that grew down at first but then went straight back up again into the rock ceiling."

Numerous theories abound as to why the stalactites are growing more bold. Some blame global warming for chemical shifts in the dripping minerals. Others feel television is to blame. But Sato has another theory:

"Many stalactites today come from modern rock. Classic rock held superior morals and produced straight stalactites. But modern rock, such as hard rock or acidic rock aren’t so solid. To keep stalactites on course, we must examine both the rocks and the role played by the minerals, the substance they communicate downward. Only with a comprehensive study of rock and role will we come to an understanding of the problem, and begin to move toward a solution. Such as an opaline silica solution, or a 50% fluorite solution."

Others feel that blaming rock is a cop-out, and that the problem lies with society’s standard of binary geological roles. Said Peter Saenz of GLAAD (Geological Land Appraisal And Diagnostics), “Who are we to say a stalactite has to be straight and hook up with a stalagmite? Maybe some stalactites are meant to meet other stalactites, maybe some stalactites want to find their own way through the caves. It’s not for us to dictate.”

This viewpoint has proven controversial, with high ranking clergy at the Vatican stating, “The Bible clearly states that speleothems are between one stalactite and one stalagmite, and that it is the stalactite’s role to descend upon the other.”

Peter Saenz retorts that the Vatican needs to mind its own business about what others go down on.

(Source: largecoin, via antiquark2)

Photo
emergentfutures:

Google and Amazon Hired These Architects to Invent the Future of Work



NBBJ describes its practices as “computational design,” an approach akin to fashioning a website or mobile app. As much as possible, it tries to anticipate and simulate how a building’s occupants — its users — will experience the spaces they inhabit. From those insights, NBBJ architects can design structures that encourage the kinds of worker behavior that the Samsungs and the Amazons believe will help their businesses succeed.

Full Story: Wired

Yes yes yes

emergentfutures:

Google and Amazon Hired These Architects to Invent the Future of Work

NBBJ describes its practices as “computational design,” an approach akin to fashioning a website or mobile app. As much as possible, it tries to anticipate and simulate how a building’s occupants — its users — will experience the spaces they inhabit. From those insights, NBBJ architects can design structures that encourage the kinds of worker behavior that the Samsungs and the Amazons believe will help their businesses succeed.

Full Story: Wired

Yes yes yes

Link

Hmm, can anyone tell me why I feel creeped out when big companies try to monopolize on emergent tech ?

(Source: emergentfutures)